Crochet Cozy Afghans, One Square at a Time

Crochet Cozy Afghans, One Square at a Time
Crochet Cozy Afghans, One Square at a Time

Crocheted squares are like building blocks. You can turn them into just about anything. Whether you’d like to make an afghan, or you have a different project in mind, there are bunches of excellent patterns you can use to make your idea a reality.

Free Crochet Patterns for Afghan Squares:

Free Granny Square Tutorial

Need instructions for how to crochet a granny square? This granny square tutorial shows you how to do it, step by step, for free.

Find Even More Outstanding Crochet Square Patterns in Pattern Books You Can Buy:

I’m aware of several truly excellent books featuring patterns for blankets and afghans you can create simply by making squares and joining them. If you enjoy working from pattern books, these are some options you’ll definitely want to consider taking a look at:

Crochet Kaleidoscope — This is my favorite book featuring crochet square patterns and other motif patterns. The book features bunches of excellent options for granny squares you can crochet — plus circles, hexagons, triangles and other shapes, too. There are also several patterns for finished projects, including one absolutely stunning blanket pattern.

Crochet Granny Squares is another one of my all-time favorite crochet pattern books. This book has some gorgeous patterns in it, including granny squares, blankets and bunches of other project types.

Unexpected Afghans — This book is a real treasure. It is exclusively dedicated to the topic of crochet afghan patterns. Many, but not all, of the patterns in this book are for granny squares you can join to create your blanket. This book is my top pick for the best crochet blanket pattern books.

I hope these resources will be helpful to you if you want to crochet an afghan using squares. Happy crocheting!

Fond Memories of Fabric Collage

I have fond memories of fabric collage, because it was the first type of collage that I remember making as a child. I really wish I had been able to hold onto onto some of my earliest fabric collages; I remember them being quite colorful and creative, and I’d love to take another look at them.

The problem was that I did not use quality adhesive, or appropriate surfaces for creating the collage backgrounds. In most cases, I used either construction paper or white ruled notebook paper, plus ordinary glue. Even at the time, the collages turned out a bit lumpy and imperfect. But in the long run, they did not stand the test of time, and we parted with them long ago.

If you ever make your own fabric collages, I’m hoping you can learn from these mistakes, and avoid them.

Want to learn more about collage? If so, I invite you to check out our pages on the topic of making collage art:

Happy crafting!

A Free Baby Beanie Pattern to Crochet Using the Back Loops

DIY Baby Beanie Free Crochet Pattern
You can crochet this easy baby beanie by working through the back loops of your stitches. This technique creates the interesting ribbed texture you see in the picture. Click here to get the free crochet baby hat pattern at KnittingandCrochet.net.

Correctly-formed crochet stitches all have components known as “loops”. There are front loops, and there are back loops. You can crochet into these loops in different patterns, a process that can be really interesting to experiment with.

Back loop single crochet stitch is one of the easiest examples of a stitch you can crochet using the back loops. There are many other stitches you can create as well.

If you’d like to learn how to do the back loop single crochet stitch, or try an easy project using this stitch, I recommend this easy ribbed crochet baby beanie pattern for beginners. It’s a quick project that will get you plenty of practice at crocheting through the back loops — plus you’ll end up with a useful project that you can give as a baby shower gift or keep for a little one in your own family.

How to Save Money on Greeting Cards

How to Stamp Greeting Card Sentiments

It’s possible to save money on your greeting cards by making them yourself. However, if you want to save more money than you spend, you almost certainly have to work out a system for getting the most out of each dollar that you spend on your supplies.

If you aren’t careful, it’s likely that you will spend more on greeting card supplies than you would have spent on buying a box of cards.

One trick to saving money is scale. You need to focus on buying supplies that will work for zillions of different cards — then working out a system for actually using the supplies, making the cards, and making enough of them that it works out to a savings.

I’ve got this down to a science, and I’m working on posting bunches of articles that will reveal these secrets to you — so that you, too, can actually save more than you spend (if you choose to apply these principles.)

For me, rubber stamps are an important part of the save-more-than-you-spend process. So one of the first installments in this series is an article about how to get the most out of your sentiment stamps.

If you’ve spent a bundle on stamps you never use, and you have “stash guilt,” but no finished cards to show for it, you definitely need to check this out. It could help you turn things around and get inspired to get out those stamps and get creating.

This is also a great article for new crafters who are interested in getting started with card-making.

Learn how to stamp greeting card sentiments.

Ideas for Crocheting With Fabric Strips

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Rag Crochet

You’ve probably seen rag rugs crocheted with fabric strips, but did you realize that you can crochet bunches of different projects with fabric instead of yarn? While rugs are ideally suited for making with this technique, there are infinite possibilities for other items that you might want to try making as well. I’ve tried crocheting rugs, tote bags, hot pads, and jewelry, but that doesn’t even begin to cover all the different possible ideas for things you could make.

This technique is often referred to as either “fabric crochet” or “rag crochet.” If you already know how to crochet, you’d use the same basic stitches you already know how to do, but with a few differences.

The most noteworthy difference I have so far encountered: usually, you would have to design and create your own rag balls before you can proceed with crocheting. (Or maybe, if you’re lucky, you could find rag balls available to buy from Etsy or similar “artsy-craftsy” online shops.)

Want to learn more? If so, you might enjoy looking at the following pages online: