Learn About the Rag Crochet Technique

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Rag Crochet

Did you know that you can crochet with strips of fabric instead of yarn or crochet thread? This technique is sometimes called either “fabric crochet” or “rag crochet.” While in many way’s it’s similar to crocheting with yarn or thread, there are also some significant differences.

The most important difference I’ve found so far: most of the time, you’ll have to make your own rag balls before you can begin crocheting. (It’s also possible that you could find rag balls for sale at Etsy or a similar venue.)

If you want to crochet large projects such as rag rugs, it helps to have a gigantic stash of fabrics and materials to draw from, particularly items such as used sheets, used linens, piles of old t-shirts, etc.

Being a textile designer, I have plenty of fabric stashed away. If you don’t, there are some different approaches you could take in getting started with this technique.

One possible approach would be to start with a really small project such as this easy fabric crochet necklace, which doesn’t require much yardage. This is a fantastic starter project for learning the rag crochet technique.

Another possibility would be to build your fabric stash so you have an abundance of materials to work with. You could ask friends and family to hand over their old clothes and t-shirts that no longer fit, or are stained, faded or worn out. These are excellent sources of material for rag crochet. You could also visit thrift shops to search for, and purchase, these items at below-retail prices.

Once you have a sizeable fabric stash to use, I hope you’ll dive into these patterns and ideas, and use all that fabric creatively — making spectacular rag crochet projects in the process.

Important Caution: Rag crochet can also be harder on the hands, so for that reason, I recommend taking extreme care when you are crocheting with fabrics. Please, please pay attention to how your hands feel, and stop crocheting at the first hint of stress or hand fatigue.

If you’d like to learn more about rag crochet, you’re invited to check out the following pages on the Internet:

Free Rag Crochet Patterns and Instructions

See Also:

By Amy Solovay

About the Author: Amy Solovay is a freelance writer with a background in textile design. She holds a bachelor’s degree with a studio art minor; and she has also obtained another degree in textile design. Amy has been crocheting and making crafts since childhood, and knitting since her teenage years. Her work also appears at AmySolovay.com, KnittingandCrochet.net and Crochet-Books.com. Amy sends out a free knitting and crochet newsletter so interested crafters can easily keep up with her new patterns and tutorials. If you’re already an Instagram user, Amy also invites you to follow her on Instagram.

This page was last updated on 8-30-2019.

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